21 Comments

  1. mossutoconstruction
    November 23, 2013 @ 4:04 am

    I am a general contractor, I have been hanging sheet rock since 1988, of all the houses and commercial building I have hung with many many other journeyman hangers, we never hang sheetrock vertically. The reason is because the sheet rock creates strength to the wall, the butt joints are not to be "rail roaded" in other words, not lined up fro top sheet to bottom sheet. The building codes are very strict about this. if a wall shifts, the vertical joint will crack. The butt joints are not hard to hide, they are pre cut, even when its a factory to factory edge. then filled with hot mud to prefill and prevent blisters from air bubbles under the tape. they are finished with two passes from 10 in knive then three wide 12 in knife. The reason there has been confusion on this is because non load baring walls such as steel stud walls in commercial buildings that have drop ceilings, are ok to hang vertically because there is no ceiling, and are easier to tape. but residential and with ceilings, yes. If you do not know why they never have hung vertically its not because it simply never occured to them to do so after its been invented. lol there is a reason, now you know. ask a contractor or look up the local codes. Thanks.

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  2. Julian Castro
    May 13, 2014 @ 8:48 am

    drywall is installed horizontally because studs are not 100% straight your joint might     end in a crooked stud, laying your drywall horizontally will make your wall straighter,  also it must be in the opposite direction then exterior plywood, it wouldn't  pass inspection where i live, they wouldn't make 10' 12' sheets.   

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  3. John Single
    June 13, 2014 @ 2:28 am

    I think I have a situation that fits.  If I hang horizontally, my walls are so tall that two sheets aren't tall enough, and I need another 30 inch tall sheet, given the time to then finish that extra cut seam, I think I am better off going vertical.

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  4. Martin R
    August 23, 2014 @ 1:37 am

    Lol at all of you guys…. look it all depend on the size of the drywall… 8ft 10ft or 12ft… and the higth of the room…. vertical if the hingth is less then the length of the sheet.. and vertical when working on long tall walls….

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  5. Martin R
    August 23, 2014 @ 1:37 am

    Lol at all of you guys…. look it all depend on the size of the drywall… 8ft 10ft or 12ft… and the higth of the room…. vertical if the hingth is less then the length of the sheet.. and vertical when working on long tall walls….

    Reply

  6. multidinero
    October 2, 2014 @ 12:42 pm

    If you're worried about butt joints, pull your tape lines wider and ensure more coverage. The indentation on the sheetrock can be used on either vertical or horizontal hanging of the rock, you'd just need to pay more attention. However, my taping skills and attention to detail make my opinion a bit bias. Butt joints never making my walls have bumps because I pride myself on being good at taping. Yet, horizontal sheetrock gives more sheer strength to a wall by holding more framing parts together. The indentation is minuscule at best. 

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  7. Magnus Engström
    July 8, 2015 @ 11:59 pm

    Here in Sweden we have always hang our drywalls vertical.

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  8. M Baterdouk
    January 30, 2016 @ 8:27 pm

    Thank you!

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  9. Jayson Thomas
    February 25, 2016 @ 7:56 pm

    I have a old house and their are no consistent measures with the stud spacing. I can place extra studs everywhere or lay the drywall horizontal with a single butt seem on half the walls. I need two extra studs per wall if I install it vertical. What would you do?

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  10. h2s
    March 29, 2016 @ 6:59 pm

    always horizontal the fibers in drywall run the length which means the shear strength is length wise. If your running it vertical your just lazy and ripping off the customer. Plywood is a different animal.

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  11. Brent Little
    August 26, 2017 @ 9:35 pm

    Thanks. 2 Thumbs Up!

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  12. bigcartoonyIIV
    January 1, 2018 @ 10:43 pm

    how do you get the 4ft span to land on a stud everytime? I know even with exterior plywood it doesn't land every stud

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  13. DON MARDO GONZALEZ
    February 22, 2018 @ 1:34 pm

    Is noo hood lol

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  14. Ryan Jackson
    April 15, 2018 @ 8:32 pm

    Plenty of options with tapered edge and square edge these days. Less plastering time with horizontal. Only bonus with vertical is easier to deal with smaller sheets

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  15. Иван Денисов
    September 1, 2018 @ 5:12 pm

    In Russia sheetrock predominantly installing vertically. And there is no problems with cracking seems.

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  16. Pirate Outlaw
    October 3, 2018 @ 1:42 am

    I have done walls on the vertical, and once after i finished a front room this way after redoing, and adding in more electrical outlets. Along with insulation that the wall seemed to have none in the first place. I left town for a bit but after my return my brother comes along, and rehangs it horizontally??? I was like why did you do that for? He answers that i did it wrong. I had to explain that putting the butt ends on the floor for the baseboards to hide them for reason #1. He then replied ohhhhhhhh! now i understand. Then reason #2 was with some ceilings that get treated with crown molding this can also help. Hang how you feel best i guess i said but wrong i did not see myself as……..

    ⎝⧹╲⎝⧹ÐΛЯΞ †o ÐЯΞΛM⧸⎠╱⧸⎠ ✨[̲̅$̲̅(̲☠)̲̅$̲̅]✨¹°°

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  17. Domagoj Vukusic
    October 8, 2018 @ 6:09 am

    given the framing is done properly, interior sheets should be installed vertically most of the time and at times horizontally. Sheer strength and fire ratings aside, the primary goal is to achieve a flat wall by applying 2 simple rules and in this order #1 lay to eliminate butt joints #2 lay to eliminate flats. I've framed, boarded, and taped (machines and by hand) in commercial, industrial, high-rise residential and residential. I've worked as a piece worker, hourly union member, and as a self employed sub contractor for 15 years, plus my family has been in this trade for 40 plus years. Lay It how you like, just follow the 2 rules!

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  18. Chris Peters
    April 9, 2019 @ 6:31 am

    American sheets are too small in Australia sheets are 18 ft

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  19. Morgan Hemingway
    April 29, 2019 @ 10:21 pm

    I was over in Europe not too long ago I noticed that the newest trend in drywall is where they're actually putting a taper on the butt joint especially when they know they're going to be cutting it in either 8 10 12 or yes I actually have 16 foot sheets of drywall. anyway you do have that option out there yeah most likely you're going to wind up cutting a butt end but you know for those of you who don't have to like when you're hanging anywhere from an eight 2A I don't know 24 foot long wall it be great to have that but joint all the way around the drywall. Okay that's my rant for this week

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  20. Ricardo Martinez
    June 4, 2019 @ 4:25 pm

    Thank you
    It was a great advice for me
    Help me with my project
    Came out GREAT !

    Reply

  21. Asdayasman
    October 9, 2019 @ 7:54 pm

    Link
    the
    playlist

    in
    the
    description

    Why does nobody on youtube understand this? It doesn't show up in related videos! The next video in the playlist is only suggested sometimes, if lots of people go directly from this video to that one, or it has very obvious naming like "Some random title | Xxxx series, part N".

    Reply

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